Contact

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

Written by
CrewAssist
November 5, 2020
Looking at the good, the bad and the ugly highlights from the most recent World Aviation Economy Data and market outlook from ICAO, IATA and Boeing.

The aviation industry has witnessed many crises before, including the 9/11 terrorist attack, the financial crisis and SARS, but the uplifting thing to see, looking at ICAO's graph of the World Aviation Economy Data, is that aviation has always been able to recover, and that quite confidently.With that said, we all sadly aware that Covid-19 is something unlike anything we've faced before, resulting in a deeper dip and a prolonged recovery time.


Data from IATA has forecasted a reduced growth, although not that severe, down from 66 to 63 percent compared to the last forecast. 
 

 


Load factors remain well below breakeven. This is obviously an important factor to get back above breakeven seeing that the airlines will not be losing money.This will be the first important phase in making sure that we preserve the industry and the operators in the marked. 
 


Looking at the variations on domestic air travel markets shows that markets that have been successful in dealing with the virus and also has a self-sustainable domestic market, such as China and Russia, are the ones that have climbed the furthest and has been able to best recover so far. These are positive indications in the market, giving us some hope that we will climb back to where we once were. 
 


The willingness to fly, measured by IATA, shows quite a span. Some shows great eagerness to travel once again, while some wants to wait a couple of months or more after the market is stabilized.

Looking positive at the pilot outlook released by Boeing a few weeks ago, compared to the one from last year, we see that North America has only been reduced by 4000 pilots over the next 20 years, from 212,000 to 208,000 and in Europe is has only been reduced by a thousand. So overall it's gone down by 41,000 on the global scale. These a numbers helps us to remember that we will get out of this eventually - and when we do there will be a need for professional air crew. Technicians, Pilots, Cabin Crew - you name it! We just need to be ready!


 

Highlight from the Boeing Outlook:
 

New personnel demand is calculated based on a 20-year fleet forecast for commercial aviation aircraft with more than 30 seats, business jets and civil helicopters. Based on fleet growth, aircraft utilization, attrition rates and regional differences in crewing specific to aircraft type, Boeing’s Pilot and Technician Outlook estimates the number of new pilots, technicians and cabin crew members needed worldwide.

While the current industry downturn, driven by COVID-19, has resulted in a temporary oversupply of qualified personnel, the long-term need remains robust. In recent decades, aviation has experienced external forces that have affected demand,such as 9/11, SARS and the Great Financial Crisis. Recovery has generally followed several years later, as the fundamentals driving passenger and air traffic demand remain strong.


- Boeing Pilot & Technician Outlook

CrewAssist

The CrewAssist team consist of a vast group of aviation experts. With backgrounds from many sectors including Airbus, SAS, IATA, Flight Global and the military sector we are here to assist you!

The aviation industry has witnessed many crises before, including the 9/11 terrorist attack, the financial crisis and SARS, but the uplifting thing to see, looking at ICAO's graph of the World Aviation Economy Data, is that aviation has always been able to recover, and that quite confidently.With that said, we all sadly aware that Covid-19 is something unlike anything we've faced before, resulting in a deeper dip and a prolonged recovery time.


Data from IATA has forecasted a reduced growth, although not that severe, down from 66 to 63 percent compared to the last forecast. 
 

 


Load factors remain well below breakeven. This is obviously an important factor to get back above breakeven seeing that the airlines will not be losing money.This will be the first important phase in making sure that we preserve the industry and the operators in the marked. 
 


Looking at the variations on domestic air travel markets shows that markets that have been successful in dealing with the virus and also has a self-sustainable domestic market, such as China and Russia, are the ones that have climbed the furthest and has been able to best recover so far. These are positive indications in the market, giving us some hope that we will climb back to where we once were. 
 


The willingness to fly, measured by IATA, shows quite a span. Some shows great eagerness to travel once again, while some wants to wait a couple of months or more after the market is stabilized.

Looking positive at the pilot outlook released by Boeing a few weeks ago, compared to the one from last year, we see that North America has only been reduced by 4000 pilots over the next 20 years, from 212,000 to 208,000 and in Europe is has only been reduced by a thousand. So overall it's gone down by 41,000 on the global scale. These a numbers helps us to remember that we will get out of this eventually - and when we do there will be a need for professional air crew. Technicians, Pilots, Cabin Crew - you name it! We just need to be ready!


 

Highlight from the Boeing Outlook:
 

New personnel demand is calculated based on a 20-year fleet forecast for commercial aviation aircraft with more than 30 seats, business jets and civil helicopters. Based on fleet growth, aircraft utilization, attrition rates and regional differences in crewing specific to aircraft type, Boeing’s Pilot and Technician Outlook estimates the number of new pilots, technicians and cabin crew members needed worldwide.

While the current industry downturn, driven by COVID-19, has resulted in a temporary oversupply of qualified personnel, the long-term need remains robust. In recent decades, aviation has experienced external forces that have affected demand,such as 9/11, SARS and the Great Financial Crisis. Recovery has generally followed several years later, as the fundamentals driving passenger and air traffic demand remain strong.


- Boeing Pilot & Technician Outlook

CrewAssist

The CrewAssist team consist of a vast group of aviation experts. With backgrounds from many sectors including Airbus, SAS, IATA, Flight Global and the military sector we are here to assist you!

The aviation industry has witnessed many crises before, including the 9/11 terrorist attack, the financial crisis and SARS, but the uplifting thing to see, looking at ICAO's graph of the World Aviation Economy Data, is that aviation has always been able to recover, and that quite confidently.With that said, we all sadly aware that Covid-19 is something unlike anything we've faced before, resulting in a deeper dip and a prolonged recovery time.


Data from IATA has forecasted a reduced growth, although not that severe, down from 66 to 63 percent compared to the last forecast. 
 

 


Load factors remain well below breakeven. This is obviously an important factor to get back above breakeven seeing that the airlines will not be losing money.This will be the first important phase in making sure that we preserve the industry and the operators in the marked. 
 


Looking at the variations on domestic air travel markets shows that markets that have been successful in dealing with the virus and also has a self-sustainable domestic market, such as China and Russia, are the ones that have climbed the furthest and has been able to best recover so far. These are positive indications in the market, giving us some hope that we will climb back to where we once were. 
 


The willingness to fly, measured by IATA, shows quite a span. Some shows great eagerness to travel once again, while some wants to wait a couple of months or more after the market is stabilized.

Looking positive at the pilot outlook released by Boeing a few weeks ago, compared to the one from last year, we see that North America has only been reduced by 4000 pilots over the next 20 years, from 212,000 to 208,000 and in Europe is has only been reduced by a thousand. So overall it's gone down by 41,000 on the global scale. These a numbers helps us to remember that we will get out of this eventually - and when we do there will be a need for professional air crew. Technicians, Pilots, Cabin Crew - you name it! We just need to be ready!


 

Highlight from the Boeing Outlook:
 

New personnel demand is calculated based on a 20-year fleet forecast for commercial aviation aircraft with more than 30 seats, business jets and civil helicopters. Based on fleet growth, aircraft utilization, attrition rates and regional differences in crewing specific to aircraft type, Boeing’s Pilot and Technician Outlook estimates the number of new pilots, technicians and cabin crew members needed worldwide.

While the current industry downturn, driven by COVID-19, has resulted in a temporary oversupply of qualified personnel, the long-term need remains robust. In recent decades, aviation has experienced external forces that have affected demand,such as 9/11, SARS and the Great Financial Crisis. Recovery has generally followed several years later, as the fundamentals driving passenger and air traffic demand remain strong.


- Boeing Pilot & Technician Outlook

CrewAssist

The CrewAssist team consist of a vast group of aviation experts. With backgrounds from many sectors including Airbus, SAS, IATA, Flight Global and the military sector we are here to assist you!

The aviation industry has witnessed many crises before, including the 9/11 terrorist attack, the financial crisis and SARS, but the uplifting thing to see, looking at ICAO's graph of the World Aviation Economy Data, is that aviation has always been able to recover, and that quite confidently.With that said, we all sadly aware that Covid-19 is something unlike anything we've faced before, resulting in a deeper dip and a prolonged recovery time.


Data from IATA has forecasted a reduced growth, although not that severe, down from 66 to 63 percent compared to the last forecast. 
 

 


Load factors remain well below breakeven. This is obviously an important factor to get back above breakeven seeing that the airlines will not be losing money.This will be the first important phase in making sure that we preserve the industry and the operators in the marked. 
 


Looking at the variations on domestic air travel markets shows that markets that have been successful in dealing with the virus and also has a self-sustainable domestic market, such as China and Russia, are the ones that have climbed the furthest and has been able to best recover so far. These are positive indications in the market, giving us some hope that we will climb back to where we once were. 
 


The willingness to fly, measured by IATA, shows quite a span. Some shows great eagerness to travel once again, while some wants to wait a couple of months or more after the market is stabilized.

Looking positive at the pilot outlook released by Boeing a few weeks ago, compared to the one from last year, we see that North America has only been reduced by 4000 pilots over the next 20 years, from 212,000 to 208,000 and in Europe is has only been reduced by a thousand. So overall it's gone down by 41,000 on the global scale. These a numbers helps us to remember that we will get out of this eventually - and when we do there will be a need for professional air crew. Technicians, Pilots, Cabin Crew - you name it! We just need to be ready!


 

Highlight from the Boeing Outlook:
 

New personnel demand is calculated based on a 20-year fleet forecast for commercial aviation aircraft with more than 30 seats, business jets and civil helicopters. Based on fleet growth, aircraft utilization, attrition rates and regional differences in crewing specific to aircraft type, Boeing’s Pilot and Technician Outlook estimates the number of new pilots, technicians and cabin crew members needed worldwide.

While the current industry downturn, driven by COVID-19, has resulted in a temporary oversupply of qualified personnel, the long-term need remains robust. In recent decades, aviation has experienced external forces that have affected demand,such as 9/11, SARS and the Great Financial Crisis. Recovery has generally followed several years later, as the fundamentals driving passenger and air traffic demand remain strong.


- Boeing Pilot & Technician Outlook

Latest articles